Embroidered flag patches

This is the current state of my collection of embroidered flag patches. (They’re all about the same size and quality now, yay!)

The ones in plastic bags are all ones I just bought in Vietnam.

These are all flags from countries I’ve visited (except that I haven’t been to Malaysia, the Philippines, or Mexico overnight, and one is the Buddhist flag).

China Hong Kong Taiwan Macau Japan Korea
India Sri Lanka Mexico Buddhism  
Laos Vietnam Singapore Philippines Thailand
Cambodia Myanmar Myanmar (old) Malaysia Indonesia
UK Spain Portugal France Hungary Germany

I also have flag patches for cities and states I’ve lived in, plus the US, plus a variety of other embroidered patches for sites, places, brands, and institutions.

I would like to have flag patches for:

  • Italy (+ Vatican City)
  • Honduras
  • UAE (no overnight visit)
  • England
  • …any other countries I visit in the future!

Small little bowl from Vietnam

This bowl came from a shop called Maroon (156 Hang Bong St).
The price was VND 88,000 (about S$5.50).

They had a lot of other pieces with a similar glaze.

vietnam-ceramics

It’s impressive that the shop has custom-printed shopping bags.
On the other hand, nobody really proofread them…

maroon-front
Maroon
interior design – glhtware – homeware
maroon-back
Dnterior desining and prodncing:
– Wooden furnitures, sofa, curtains
– Giftware, homeware, ceramics, silk,
Lacquers

Six Little Princes

I’m fascinated by books that transmit knowledge and culture across language barriers, which is why I have whole shelves of familiar books in unfamiliar languages. (I’m not crazy; I’m erudite! At least that’s what I keep telling myself.)

One of the books I own in multiple languages is The Little Prince by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry.

Above are copies in Lao(atian), Khmer (the language of Cambodia), Vietnamese, Portuguese, the original French, and Italian.

I bought the Lao and Khmer copies at Monument Books in Vientiane in 2015; I just recently bought the Vietnamese one at one of the three Artbook locations in Hanoi; I bought the Portuguese one in Porto, Portugal, in 2004. I unknowingly kicked off the habit of buying Le Petit Prince in other languages when I bought the Italian one in Italy in 2002. I probably bought the English version between 1999 and 2004.

The French copy is the one I used when I was a senior in high school. The book, designed for students, includes a glossary at the back, but I added footnotes.

le-petit-prince
My handwriting, age 18. Meh.

Do I have an English translation of Le Petit Prince? Yes, but it’s not in the photo because it’s in a box with a bunch of other books we don’t have shelves for. There is more than one such box.

in-a-box
That’s my English-language copy of The Little Prince.

Bottom left, you see 1984? I have that in Portuguese, too.

Visit to Evernew Books

I went to the National Library to write some snail mail in peace and quiet. When the mail was ready, I went next door to drop it in the postbox at Bras Basah Complex. Then I got snared by the used book bookshop on the corner there. It must have been at least an hour later that I re-emerged with SG$20 less in my wallet and these six books in my backpack.

More on these books below.

Continue reading Visit to Evernew Books

You can run but you can’t hide, JM Ice Truck #15

So cute. It’s trying to hide behind that plant, but it doesn’t realize that just because it can’t see me doesn’t mean I can’t see it…

I collect sightings of JM Ice trucks because they’re so colorful. I’ve now seen at least 22 of the 38 or more trucks in the fleet.

This is the first time I’ve ever seen #15, though, and it was sitting still so I got a photo!

I thought usually #37 delivered to Chinatown… Ah well.

“I don’t always send snail mail…

…but when I do, I use as many old stamps as I can get my hands on.” —Mom

Here are stamps from 2002, 2004, 2006, and 2012. (Because honestly, who restocks their stationery drawer in odd-numbered years?)

Wait, hang on, that Elvis one is from 1993! We Wertses had that stamp several years before we had email!

It’s not worth anything, though; I checked. Apparently the 1993 Elvis stamp was really popular, so the US Postal service printed tons and tons of them. Which is probably (part of) why the Werts house still had some in 2016.*

The Wertses aren’t the only ones to affix ridiculous numbers of stamps to things, though. I think the Hobors still hold the record.

 


*Update: Mom says at least some of these stamps (including the Elvis one) came from me! Apparently I gave her a bunch of stamps when I left the US in 2008 and knew I would not be able to use them to mail things from Singapore.

The curse of the invariably heavy suitcases

Books and rocks are just about the heaviest things one could imagine bringing back from a vacation, and yet books and rocks are exactly what we brought back from our latest trip to the opposite side of the planet.

In fact, bringing back books and/or rocks from trips is fairly typical for us. What made this trip’s haul particularly absurd was that the books were about rocks.